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Winemaking Terms - Rotling to Secondary Fermentation Vessel

Tuesday, May 09, 2006



Rotling:

A rose-colored wine made by mixing red and white grapes together at the crush.

Sachet:

A paper, foil, mylar, or plastic packet of dehydrated, freeze-dried, dried, or active dried yeast. A sachet typically holds 5 grams of product, although 35- to 100-gram sachets of some products are available.

Sauerkraut:

An odor in wines, attributed to lactic acid, that have undergone excessive malo-lactic fermentation. This fault is most often found in wines made from malic-dominate bases (such as blackberry) which undergo unchecked malo-lactic fermentation.

Sec:

French for dry. A wine becomes dry when all or most of the sugar within it has been converted through fermentation into alcohol and carbon dioxide. A wine is usually perceived as dry when residual sugar is at or below a specific gravity of 0.999.

Second Wine:

A wine made from the pomace or strained pulp obtained from making a first wine. A second wine will require that the pomace or pulp be ameliorated with water, sugar, yeast nutrients, and possibly acid and tannin, but usually not pectic enzyme. Sulfites, however, should be introduced at once to achieve and unbound sulfur level of 45-55 ppm. A second wine cannot usually be made in the same volume as the original wine from which the pomace or pulp was obtained, but a volume of 1/3 to 2/3 the original is usuallly attained.

Secondary:

A jug, jar, bottle, demi-john, or carboy in which the second phase of alcohol fermentation takes place (the first phase is the primary phase). This vessel typically has a wide body and tapered neck leading up to a small opening which can be sealed with an air lock. Also known as the secondary fermentation vessel.
 
Secondary Fermentation:
 
A second alcohol fermentation by yeast performed in a champagne bottle secured with a special, hollow closure secured with a wire "cage," the purpose of which is to trap the carbon dioxide produced by the fermentation and force it to be absorbed into the wine, or a bacterial fermentation called malolactic fermentation. The result is a Sparkling Wine. This secondary fermentation can actually be a continuation of the fermentation by the original yeast inoculation or can be induced at bottling time by inoculating a sweetened still wine with a second yeast especially adept at fermenting under pressure. It is NOT correct to refer to the alcohol fermentation in a secondary fermentation vessel (e.g. a carboy) as a secondary fermentation although novices to the hobby often do. See Primary Fermentation for contrast. However, a malolactic fermentation is correctly a secondary fermentation.
 
Secondary Fermentation Vessel:
 
A jug, jar, bottle, demi-john, or carboy in which the second phase of fermentation takes place. This vessel typically has a wide body and tapered neck leading up to a small opening which can be sealed with an air lock. Also known as the secondary.



Source: Jack Keller

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