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Winemaking Terms - Sediment to Skunky

Thursday, May 11, 2006


Sediment:

The grainy, bitter-tasting deposit sometimes found in bottles of older wines. Sediment is the natural separation of bitartrates, tannins, and color pigments that occurs as wines age and may indicate a wine of superior maturity. Also known as Crust, especially in port wines.
 
Semi-Dry:

The term denoting a wine as neither dry nor sweet, but closer to dry than sweet. Although usually reserved for sparkling wines, it is gaining frequent use describing still wines. A wine is usually perceived as semi-dry when its specific gravity is in the range of 1.000 to 1.003. The French call such wine demi-sec, which has been bastardized into the half English, half French semi-sec.
 
Semi-Sweet:

The term denoting a wine as neither dry nor sweet, but closer to sweet than dry. Although usually reserved for sparkling wines, it is gaining frequent use describing still wines. A wine is usually perceived as semi-sweet when its specific gravity is in the range of 1.004 to 1.007. The French term for this type of wine is demi-doux.
 
Sherrified:

A table wine that has become sherry-like due to oxidation.
 
Silky:

An incredibly smooth, lush, and finely textured wine. 
 
Skunky:

A severe off-odor caused by mercaptan formation.



 



Source: Jack Keller

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